Sunday, October 31, 2010

A myriad of excuses

I simply do not understand why people who turn in senior animals to shelters, make these assinine excuses.
I am allergic. The dog is anxious. I am tired of vaccuming up cat hair. He/she doesn't like my new boyfriend/girlfriend. They are too old to play with the kids any more. The list is never ending and the excuses are still excuses.
I wonder what every happened to the good old American can do attitude? Where when you made a committment to a pet, you kept it, regardless of what that might consist of or how hard it might be?
It might make you wonder how they are going to be when their parents or grandparents get old.

Sweet senior Sam

Gainesville recently rescued a sweet senior yellow Lab named Sam from one of our local shelters. Our volunteer was there for something else, and someone who worked there asked if he had heard about this girl. If he had not been there, she surely would have been quietly euthanized the next day. We couldn't let this poor thing meet her end in the shelter. It turns out that this dog had been a patient of a doctor in Gainesville her whole life, until the day that her owner inexplicably turned her in. She was understandably traumatized at first but has really settled in and is just a sweetie.
So if by chance anyone you know is looking to do a really good deed and help a sweet old girl live her final years in dignity, and/or knows someone who would appreciate an easygoing loyal companion, Sam could be the right match. Please check her out here: http://www.petfinder.com/petdetail/17769816
She is being fostered in Altamonte Springs.

A voice of one

You never know when something you say may change a person's mind. Although I like to argue as well as the next person, sometimes subtlety of simply voicing your thought can make all the difference in what a person may decide to do.
I walk a mile each morning on my break at work. This walk takes me through a neighborhood with dogs which are loose, tied, held in arms or walked properly on leashes.
One morning as I was walking, there were two young men standing on the corner. Each had a pit bull on a leash and it looked as if they were trying to introduce the two dogs. Now these were nice looking dogs. You could tell they had been fed and taken care of.
I had to wait on traffic to finish before I could cross the road and I ask them to please not let the dogs fight. "Oh no." they both said. "We want them to like each other so they can mate!"
Well, to me that is just as bad so I spoke to them for a few minutes. Quoted some stats on euthanasia of the breed, cancers of unaltered dogs, both male and female and then asked them to think about what I had said.
As the traffic thinned so I cross the road, I heard one young man say to another, "Man, I don't want my dog to have any problems. Have you ever heard about that?" The other young man said, "No, I just want pups." The first young man then responded, "I don't know man, I gotta think about this some more."
Now, he probably didn't change his mind. But what if he did?

Off topic, but VERY important

Once in a while, I simply must go off topic even if the topic I want to talk about really is about animals.
Tuesday, if you haven't voted early, is the day to vote. Many, many things can be accomplished with the power of the ballot box. If animal rights is your passion, you can affect outcome with many state laws and ordinances if they are important to you.
I vote in every election. I have not missed one since I registered to vote on my 18th birthday. Because I do vote, I can complain. I do not care who you vote for or even it you are voting against someone, but I do care people are so apathetic any more, they don't even both to go to the polls.
Please go vote.

Senior Labrador available for adoption

Editor's note: I have been featuring Bo on this blog since the creation of this blog. If you love labradors and want to make a difference in one life, please consider giving Bo the home he is so deserving of.

Bo, here. I am the senior citizen of the Lab Retriever web site. You know what that means; I come with a senior citizen discount.
I am a 10 year old yellow lab. I was surrendered by my owner because one of the family members was frightened by me. Trust me, I am a gentle giant, I walk well on a leash, I have never shown aggression to dogs, cats or children. I love to retrieve, and I love to swim. I am well-behaved. I sleep outside of bedrooms.
I do have some tricks; I can open latch-style doors with my nose. I also counter-surf if there are tasty items to reach. I have a little bit of arthritis, but who doesn't at nearly 70? I am adjusting well to my foster family's home. I would like to have my own buddy to take on walks and make my last couple of years cherished and fun. You can meet a fun senior citizen in Bradenton.
Lab Rescue is proud to offer special programs to our valued seniors, ages 60 and older. We're currently offering two special programs aimed at our Florida senior community. For more information, email http://www.labradorrescue.net/info@lrrof.org?Subject=Senior%20Programs or mention the program in the comments section of the online application.
LRROF Senior for Seniors Program offers adopters over the age of 60 (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger) to receive a 50% discounted adoption rate when they adopt a dog ages 8 and older. As part of this program, adopters will also receive a startup kit (bowl, heartworm flea/tick preventative, toy).
Purina Seniors Program, sponsored by the folks at Purina, will offer a $50 discount on the adoption fee of any adopted animal from LRROF for those aged 60 and older (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger). Only 5 of these promotions are available, on a first come, first served basis. Adopter may choose to donate the $50 back to Lab Rescue at their choice.

And speaking of Gizmo's...

My friend Stacy, adopted a very shy, I mean petrified, hound mix several years ago from the local shelter. The strides she has made in the past few years are due to the incredible commitment Stacy and her husband made to the two shelter dogs they adopted. Jazz normally gets the kudos, but today I am saying good job to Gizmo.
Here is her first attempt at lure coursing.

Check her out here on her second time.

Beautiful cat needs a new home

Meet Gizmo.
He was dumped after his own adopted a dog.
He would really like a furever home for the holidays.
Gizmo is neutered, up to date on shots and ready to go.
If you would like more information on Gizmo please contact:

TANKS,Inc.
822-0300

Tuesday, October 26, 2010

Senior Labradors available for adoption

Hi everyone! We're a handsome duo of brothers named Brandon and Pegasus who have been together forever and would love to stay that way.
Sure we take up a bit more room as a pair and have some special needs, but we also give double the love , affection and thankfulness that comes with lab luv!
We are big and blocky 8 year old labs who have lost a good deal of weight and are learning to go on daily walks to get our activity level up. We mostly prefer to lounge around the house and look handsome, and would do best in a quiet home without any other pets or children. So if you're looking for great companion labs who will never forget your special care, give Dan in Ormond Beach a shout.
Lab Rescue is proud to offer special programs to our valued seniors, ages 60 and older. We're currently offering two special programs aimed at our Florida senior community. For more information, email http://www.labradorrescue.net/info@lrrof.org?Subject=Senior%20Programs or mention the program in the comments section of the online application.
LRROF Senior for Seniors Program offers adopters over the age of 60 (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger) to receive a 50% discounted adoption rate when they adopt a dog ages 8 and older. As part of this program, adopters will also receive a startup kit (bowl, heartworm flea/tick preventative, toy).
Purina Seniors Program, sponsored by the folks at Purina, will offer a $50 discount on the adoption fee of any adopted animal from LRROF for those aged 60 and older (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger). Only 5 of these promotions are available, on a first come, first served basis. Adopter may choose to donate the $50 back to Lab Rescue at their choice.

1 busted, how many more?

I was pleased to see the police bust up another suspected fighting group and arrest a man for cruelty. The problem of dog fighting is so ingrained in some cultures, this one bust is only the tip of the iceberg.
The unfortunate part, as we learn every time another one gets busted, the really organized groups simply go further and further underground. This makes it extremely difficult to infiltrate these rings, which not only include dog fighting or cockfighting, but guns, drugs and other illegal activities.
We can only hope they continue to bust these smaller groups and concentrate on working their way into the more organized ones. When money is involved though, you can be the police won't have an easy time of it.

A registry for animal abusers

What a great idea.
The correlation between those who abuse animals and those who abuse humans is something which most people who study these things knows about. Serial killers who start out abusing and killing small animals has been documented since they began documenting serial killers.
But now, in New York, the are getting ready to pass a law for persons convicted of abusing animals to register on the animal abuse registry. Check it out here.
I like this idea.

Options for pets with disabilities

I have known many wonderful animals who had some kind of disability or another, whether they were blind, or deaf or even missing limbs. I can tell you about the deaf pit bull who now goes with his owner everywhere. Or Spike, who lives at the shelter I am at and has such a joy of life, despite his blindness.
This is a very good article and you will enjoy reading it. It offers hope to pet parents who still want to be able to offer their pet a quality of life, despite a disability.

Sunday, October 24, 2010

Senior Labrador available for adoption

Ahoy mateys! My name is Bee Bee, a friendly chocolate gal. Everybody thought I was 6 years of age because I'm an active lab, but the vet says I'm probably 9.
I'm an affectionate gal who loves to play ball, swim, and cuddle. I love people and get along very well with other dogs. Someone shot me with BBs but I know that most people would not do a thing like that, and I want to find a loving home.
Riding in the car is lots of fun and my foster mom says to be sure to tell you that I have good house manners. To see a short video of me, click here! Then come toss a ball for me in my foster's pool in Clearwater. Don't forget your swim suit; we have lots of towels.

Lab Rescue is proud to offer special programs to our valued seniors, ages 60 and older. We're currently offering two special programs aimed at our Florida senior community. For more information, email http://www.labradorrescue.net/info@lrrof.org?Subject=Senior%20Programs or mention the program in the comments section of the online application.
LRROF Senior for Seniors Program offers adopters over the age of 60 (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger) to receive a 50% discounted adoption rate when they adopt a dog ages 8 and older. As part of this program, adopters will also receive a startup kit (bowl, heartworm flea/tick preventative, toy).
Purina Seniors Program, sponsored by the folks at Purina, will offer a $50 discount on the adoption fee of any adopted animal from LRROF for those aged 60 and older (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger). Only 5 of these promotions are available, on a first come, first served basis. Adopter may choose to donate the $50 back to Lab Rescue at their choice.

Welcome to Florida

I was very sad to read the article about the alligator who ate the dog. It is simply horrible to think of even losing a pet this way, much less to watch it.
Being a native, alligators were always around when I was a kid. Growing up in central Florida, we did not have the opportunity to swim anywhere but lakes and phosphate pits. I can guarantee there were gators in both. I never saw one. In fact, none of us kids ever saw one. The reason is we knew better than to feed them. We knew better than to allow our dogs close to the water's edge, although before all the leash laws, many of our dogs swam in the lakes after romping through town before collapsing on the front porch to sleep the heat of the day away. the gators were more frightened of us because we did not desensitize them to humans so they did not associate us with food. Alligators are not, like their cousins the crocodiles, aggressive in nature. Food sources are food sources and as this article states, dogs are low to the ground and gators think food.
As more and more people move to this state, the problems become huge for the gators. If one eats a dog or becomes to close to humans, they attempt to relocate it to a less populated area. These less populated areas are becoming few and far between. The gator is sometimes destroyed just for being a gator.
I think everyone who moves to Florida should have a handbook showing the native critters and what they do. Maybe then they would learn what can happen when you don't pay attention to what the natives have told you all along.

Things which make me angry

The report out of south Florida of the man who tried to have his dog cremated after beating it to death simply sickens me.
I will NEVER understand why people own pets and then try to justify when the kill them, however it is done.
Five minutes with a billy club, that is all I ask. Just 5 minutes.

Digging dogs

I have never owned a dog who dug holes. I am lucky that way. Digging is a natural sport for dogs. Some dig to reach cool dirt to lay down in. Some dig, hunting for those elusive moles who tunnel underground. Some bury things. Some dig just to be digging.
One of my Mom's recued dogs was turned in to the shelter because she dug holes. I guess the people had never heard of a shovel. She spent the next 16 years of her life and never dug one hole.
Buzz doesn't dig holes. Buzz buries things. The things he buries are rawhides and marrow bones. He can't figure out how to eat them all in one sitting, so to protect them from all the other animals who might steal them, he buries them. Now, no other critters live inside my house so this has to be hardwired into his DNA somewhere.
After making an unscheduled trip to Orlando yesterday and not getting home until very early this morning, I gave Buzz a frozen marrow bone as a treat. I figured he could lay on the floor and chew on it all day and I could assuage my guilt at not being home last night.
But Buzz, being the hoarder he is, promptly took it outside, dug a hole by the oak tree, buried it, used his nose to cover it up and came back in the house.
In a few hours I expect the squirrels will find the bone, scamper up the oak tree and begin feasting on it. When Buzz decides to go back for it, he will go right to the spot and it will be gone. I am sure he wonders what happens to these bones, but I don't have the heart to tell him the squirrels are living high cotton when he buries his treasure.

Senior Labrador available for adoption

HI everyone! My name is NALA, a super-friendly gal who wants to be your cuddling pal.
I love to run on the beach, go for rides in the car, and then snuggle. I get along very well with other dogs and cats. My foster mom said to let you know that I have wonderful house manners and that I'm sweet as sugar.
Come on over, just north of St Pete, and we'll take a nice walk together. If you're a senior citizen, be sure to ask about the special adoption fee discount available to you when you adopt a senior lab like me.
Lab Rescue is proud to offer special programs to our valued seniors, ages 60 and older. We're currently offering two special programs aimed at our Florida senior community. For more information, email http://www.labradorrescue.net/info@lrrof.org?Subject=Senior%20Programs or mention the program in the comments section of the online application.
LRROF Senior for Seniors Program offers adopters over the age of 60 (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger) to receive a 50% discounted adoption rate when they adopt a dog ages 8 and older. As part of this program, adopters will also receive a startup kit (bowl, heartworm flea/tick preventative, toy).
Purina Seniors Program, sponsored by the folks at Purina, will offer a $50 discount on the adoption fee of any adopted animal from LRROF for those aged 60 and older (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger). Only 5 of these promotions are available, on a first come, first served basis. Adopter may choose to donate the $50 back to Lab Rescue at their choice.

Thursday, October 21, 2010

How fast time goes by

This was published a year ago when I lost my Gypsy girl. As I do with all my animals, I remind myself once a year how special they were. Here's to you my beloved Gypsy.

Losing one beloved dog in a year is a lot. Losing two, just makes the year even worse than it would be.Gypsy had nothing going for her when she was dropped off at the HSSC except the sweetest disposition and a constantly wagging tail.
She was listed as a rottweiler/ridegeback mix, 12 years old, covered in fleas, not spayed with a thin coat and horrible breath. She was more black and tan coonhound than anything.
She came in February, and after two weeks of watching her lay in her kennel, I simply could not allow her to not live the rest of her life in a cage. Every time you spoke to her, the tail would go thump, thump, thump and she would raise her head and look at you to see if you were going to take her outside.
Being that I have a thing for discarded senior dogs, she came home with me after an introduction to the king of the household, Junior. She quickly showed him she would be queen and took over his bed, his couch and anything else he laid claim to.
She was a lazy dog, as many hounds are unless they are working, and loved to lay on her bed and watch the world go by out the window.
After Junior died, she has tolerated Buzz for the past 6 months and even attempted to play a tad bit, but you could tell she was slowing down. When she stopped eating last week, I knew something was wrong. Then she swelled up like a balloon and the vet took x-rays. He sent them off and the wait began. On Tuesday, the news was all bad. She had a huge tumor in her stomach which had metastasized to her lungs. She was not in any pain yet, but was more and more uncomfortable with the swelling. The decision to have a beloved pet put to sleep in anything but easy. I had a friend tell me something which made a lot of sense to me. "I would rather have them go easy a week too early, than suffer for one day to long."
Go easy my beautiful, old, fat hound dog. I will miss you.

Hope for the Homeless

Reprinted from October, 2009 Just as relevent 2 years later.



I am asked all the time why I dedicate so much time and effort into rescued animals. People say, "There are so many other worthwhile groups out there and you give your time to animals."I say to them, "There are lots of groups for humans, children and adults alike. There are groups for artists, and art students; groups for alternate lifestyles; groups for addicts, and the list goes on." These groups are not sentenced to death by the system. Homeless animals are.
They are sentenced to death every day in this country, because of breed, or temperment or age. They are hauled off to gas chambers in some parts of the rural south. Many are given a shot they never wake up from. They are then hauled to a county landfill somewhere, or dumped in a crematorium. When was the last time you visited a county dump and saw the mound of animals piled eight or ten feet high with companion animals no one wants?
It is easier to pretend this doesn't happen.Dinner conversations don't revolve around homeless animals. It is easier to put your head in the sand and say it is not your problem.
Therein lies the problem. You give that control to other people because you don't want to be bothered with it. You don't spay and neuter your pets. You don't keep your animals contained to your home. You don't have to hear them cry at night after you have left them. You don't have to see the look on their face as they are given a death sentence or hold their bodies while life goes away. You have made it someone else's problem.
These are the reasons I do what I do. These are the reasons most animal welfare workers go to work every day for little pay. You won't receive a death sentence if someone doesn't want you. These animals don't have a choice. It has already been made for them.

Senior Labrador available for adoption

Hi everyone! My name is Autumn, a mellow yellow gal with a loving personality.
I was alone and afraid after being left at the county shelter after giving love and companionship for many years. My family lost their home and we were living in a truck. I heard someone say that my time was up and I did not know what to do! Thankfully, my guardian angel appeared and the friendly lady who looked after us in the shelter phoned Labrador Rescue. Now I am in a comfy foster home waiting for an adopting family to come meet me.
I love to snuggle and to take walks. In my photo you can see me with one of my avian friends. I love swimming and you can see me at http://www.labrescuefl.org/ having a blast at my secret swimming hole. The vet said that I'm a healthy gal and my eyes sparkle whenever folks pet me. I have excellent house manners and everyone tells my foster mom how pretty I am. I get along very well with other dogs of all ages. My tail wags whenever a person calls my name. Imagine a nice autumn night ;-) with me cuddling by your feet while you surf the web. Life couldn’t be better! My coat is light yellow and I'm 10 years of age. If you want a loving companion, I’m your gal.

Lab Rescue is proud to offer special programs to our valued seniors, ages 60 and older. We're currently offering two special programs aimed at our Florida senior community. For more information, email http://www.labradorrescue.net/info@lrrof.org?Subject=Senior%20Programs or mention the program in the comments section of the online application.
LRROF Senior for Seniors Program offers adopters over the age of 60 (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger) to receive a 50% discounted adoption rate when they adopt a dog ages 8 and older. As part of this program, adopters will also receive a startup kit (bowl, heartworm flea/tick preventative, toy).
Purina Seniors Program, sponsored by the folks at Purina, will offer a $50 discount on the adoption fee of any adopted animal from LRROF for those aged 60 and older (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger). Only 5 of these promotions are available, on a first come, first served basis. Adopter may choose to donate the $50 back to Lab Rescue at their choice.

Anti-tethering in Hillsborough County

Have you ever met a dog who has been tied up or chained their whole lives? Have you ever read the statistics on dog bites and aggression for dogs which are tethered.? If you had, you would wonder why this is even under discussion.
The first time I came in contact with a viscious dog who had been tethered, I was volunteering at the shelter and we had taken in a beautiful Golden Retriever. She was about 3 years old and had never lived off a chain. She was also one of the most vicious dogs I have ever met. Fearful and snapping and no one was comfortable taking her out of her kennel. I believe she went to a rescue group for Retrievers.
Now most people who know a golden or have a golden will tell you that is not possible, but I saw it and I attribute it to being tied her whole life.
The following email came in my box a day or so ago, so please let Hillsborough know you support anti-tethering. We got it passed in Sarasota County and we will continue to work to get it passed statewide.

"BayNews 9 had a great clip of news coverage this morning on the ordinance. They are now running an online poll that could be very helpful in supporting an anti-tethering ordinance in Hillsborough County. It only takes a minute and you don't have to register. Please vote today at:
http://tinyurl.com/26p4s2m Also, please share with as many of your friends as you possibly can. The more proof we have that the "silent majority" really do want to unchain animals in this county, the more ammunition we have against the very vocal minority who use dogs for profit and still want them on chains.
Thanks for your help with this!!
Barbara LaPresti
Please sign my petition for an Anti-Tethering Ordinance to end dog chaining by following the link below:
http://www.petitionspot.com/petitions/antitethering
“The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated”.

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Tuesday, October 19, 2010

Dogs and toys

I have owned dogs who never picked up a toy. I have had dogs who would destroy a squeaky toy just to get to the squeaker and once that was accomplished, they never looked at the toy again. I have had dogs love balls and ignore balls. Destroy soft toys and sleep with them at night.
Buzz is the weirdest dog I have had when it comes to his toys.
When I adopted Buzz, he brought home a stuffed giraffe which had been his favorite soft toy at the shelter. He came home to a toy box full of bones, stuff toys, balls and anything else my dogs had been given over the years.
He places the toys in certain spots in the living room and dining room and when you try to pick up the toys and put them away, he follows behind you and pulls them all out again. Each one is loving placed in a different spot and then he goes and lays on his bed.
When he wants to play, it is only with stuffed toys. He brings them to you, shakes his head, throws them in the air, and then expects you to pick them up and throw them across the room and the will run and get them. He won't bring them back. Just hold them in his mouth, wag his tail and shake them. He will not chase them in the yard, but will on the pool deck and anywhere in the house as long as it is not a corner where he feesl trapped.
I had never seen him play with a ball until a couple of days ago and now he has a green, squeaky ball which he will treat the way he treats his soft toys.
When Mark, my boyfriend, brought his little Boston terrier over one weekend he and Buzz got along fine. Ben would play with Buzz's toys and squeak them over and over. Then Ben went home and when I came in from work, Buzz had gathered all his toys on his bed and was laying on them. I expect it was to prevent Ben from playing with them any longer.
So he is a little weird, but I love him anyway. He can lay as long as he wants on top of his toys.

Fundraiser for the animals


Check out this ad on the inside front cover of "Natural Awakenings Magazine" in New Orleans. You can get tickets at http://www.animalconnection.com/ and even if you aren't going to be in New Orleans for the event, it is a great cause and you could win a 1 week stay in Costa Rica or Steamboat.

Flyball Event in Sarasota next April update

The Flyball event next April will be April 16 & 17 at the Manatee Civic Center!
Details to follow... but it is officially sanctioned. It is sure to be a great raffle, lots of racing, vendors... spread the word!"
I will post updates as they become available.

5th Annual Lab Fest

Labrador Retriever Rescue of Florida invites everyone and their best friends (leashed only) to the 5th Annual Lab Fest, a day of fun and frolic.
Raffles, Games, prizes, contests and loads of fun await.

Saturday November 20, 2010
Four Freedoms Park in Cape Coral, Florida
9:00 AM - 1:00 PM

$5.00 donation per dog suggested
Proceeds benefit Wagging Tails Dog Park in Cape Coral and Labrador Retriever Rescue of Florida

For more info contact Cape Dog Bakery at 239-542-9663

Senior Labrador available for adoption

Ahoy, there! My name is ROCKY; 9 years young and still a puppy at heart, as you can see in my video.
My family fell on hard times and now I need a new home. I love to be around people and live the active Florida life. I'm good friends with other dogs, cats and even a parrot. My foster mom taught me how to ride in a boat. I even wear a life jacket. I love to swim, go for walks and play with tennis balls. Come throw a ball to my foster mom’s place just northwest of Tampa.
For information on Rocky, please contact Labrador Rescue at http://www.lrrof.org/.
*********************************************
Lab Rescue is proud to offer special programs to our valued seniors, ages 60 and older. We're currently offering two special programs aimed at our Florida senior community. For more information, email http://www.labradorrescue.net/info@lrrof.org?Subject=Senior%20Programs or mention the program in the comments section of the online application.
LRROF Senior for Seniors Program offers adopters over the age of 60 (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger) to receive a 50% discounted adoption rate when they adopt a dog ages 8 and older. As part of this program, adopters will also receive a startup kit (bowl, heartworm flea/tick preventative, toy).
Purina Seniors Program, sponsored by the folks at Purina, will offer a $50 discount on the adoption fee of any adopted animal from LRROF for those aged 60 and older (only one adopter needs to be over 60, a spouse or partner can be 60 or younger). Only 5 of these promotions are available, on a first come, first served basis. Adopter may choose to donate the $50 back to Lab Rescue at their choice.

Just a matter of time

I often wondered how long it would take. You know, the subject of a dog ban. You see, we humans would much rather ban a dog breed than hold the humans responsible. Humans are infallible.
The tragedy which happened when the two dogs climbed the fence, or went under the fence, or however they reached the other yard, has happened before. It will also happen again. It will happen because humans who own pets are irresponsible sometimes. It is easier to blame the dogs than the human caretakers.
The editorial in my old newspaper, thank God, did not recommend banning pit bulls. It was a logical editorial for the most part and I hope the writer could hear me in the background talking about the failure of breed bans. You can read it here.
We must continue to educate people and hold humans responsible. HUMANS, not dogs. Dogs are still dogs and do dog things. When we stop treating them like humans and take responsibility for them and all the trouble they may get into, maybe tragedies such as this one will be less likely.

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Senior Labrador available for adoption

Meet MAX, a 10 year young AKC yellow male who needs a new
home because a family member is allergic to dogs.
Max barks when he needs to go out, goes on daily walks, loves to swim, knows commands and will hold a treat on his nose until given the okay to toss the treat and eat it! Max is everything you could want in a Lab - he's friendly, easy going, loveable, obedient and playful.
Yes, he does have an addiction to playing catch and you do have to hide tennis balls and not mention the word b-a-l-l or he will spring into action! Max is dog friendly and good with everyone! He is especially happy when he can play with kids.

Hallmark provides another must see movie


Sundays are my kick back and relax days. Since I began my self self imposed restriction on watching the NFL, which happened after they left Michael Vick come back into the league, I sometimes find a movie worth watching on Sunday afternoon.
When it has Richard Gere in it is is worth watching. Add a beautiful Akita and a super sad story and I stay put for 2 hours.
Because Akitas are on the banned list for insurance, I felt it would be appropriate to tell you about this movie and what a great story it ends up being. Sad, very sad and you will need tissues, but a great story to watch.
I won't tell you the plot or what happens, but it was based on a true store of a dog named Hatchi who lived and died in Japan. This movie Americanizes it but the story remains the same.

Thursday, October 14, 2010

The "dog" in all of them

Owning a pet brings new understanding to animal behavior with things you may have never thought of before.
All of us have seen our pets chase things. Lizards, birds, squirrels, bugs, raccoons, oppossums, other dogs and/or cats.
I hate to see animals chase other animals or even bugs because the end result if they are caught is death and I simply hate to see things killed.
This is the reason I wish all people would put bells on their cats and try and keep stray, wild critters out of their yards but some things are simply impossible to prevent.
The first time I had one of my animals kill another animal, it was Jessie, one of my rotts. An elderly lady on Anna Maria Island had begun feeding the raccoons who lived in the mangrove swamp bordering my road. The raccoons had lost their fear of humans so when a mama coon and her babies came strolling through my yard one day, Jessie caught one of the babies and killed it. She then brought it to me as if to say, see leader, I can catch food. It was quite the eye-opening experience for me. My first thought was to punish her, but she was simply being a dog. Then, of course, I started bawling because she killed the baby raccoon. So I had Jeremy, my son, dig a hole and I buried the baby.
I had not thought about that incident when I moved into Sarasota and shortly after my new rotti, Carmela came to live with me, she caught a squirrel and killed it while I was in the shower. She then proceeded to bring it upstairs and place it at the door to my bedroom so I had a present when I came out of the shower. Once again, she was simply being a dog. Once again, I got Jeremy to dig a hole and I buried the little squirrel.
When I got Buzz, I knew he had lived outside his whole life, but I never once thought he would attempt to kill anything. He chases all the critters who live in my backyard, but once they reach the fenceline, he stops and lets them get away.
Yesterday morning, before daybreak, I could hear him growling. I looked out the sliding doors and saw Buzz circling a oppossum. The oppossum was spitting and snarling but Buzz kept circling. Now, Buzz has no front teeth. He has his canines, but the vet says he believes he lost his front teeth by chewing on sticks and rocks trying to get enough to eat. Oppossums on the other hand, have razor teeth and sharp claws and in that battle, I knew Buzz would lose.
I finally had to get his leash and collar, dodge the oppossum and pull him in the house to get him away long enough for the wild critter to run off.
Phew! Death avoided.
Imagine my dismay when this morning the same scenario presented itself. Only this time, it was a rabbit. They are not equipped with the same tools a oppossum has, so when Buzz didn't come back inside I went searching and found him with his paw on top of a rabbit and the rabbit squealing. It took the pool scooper and stern words from me to get the dog away from the rabbit and in the interim time, I heard thumping and squealing. I just knew Buzz had killed the rabbit by the time I got him in the house and saw tufts of rabbit fur hanging from his mouth and his tail wagging 90 miles a minute.
It was still dark when I left for work and I could not see if the rabbit had hopped off, so I worried all day about coming home to bury the rabbit. Imagine my surprise when I checked the yard after work and discovered no rabbit, except a live one hopping through the yard.
I warned the rabbit he should go under the fence, which he did, before I let Buzz outside.
I guess Buzz is a dog, just like any other dog, and he will try and catch anything in the yard he can.
The sign on my yard should say, No Trespassing. I wish rabbits could read.

Labrador available for adoption

I’m Jojo, a very active 1 year old boy that Lab Rescue liberated from a shelter.
I was scared, lonely and so glad when a nice lady came to take me to a foster home. Now, I have good food, a great place to sleep and medicine for my skin.
It will take a while for my skin to clear up, but once it does I will have a beautiful shiny black coat. I can't give this condition to any other dogs so I am having a great time playing and learning to socialize with my foster sisters.
I am also learning essential commands now that I am part of a family. I love the treats I get when I do a good job. My foster Mom says I am learning fast. I would love some visitors to come to Naples and we can play together.
Labrador Retriever Rescue of Florida is a state-wide, foster home based, all volunteer rescue group. To inquire about the Labs available for adoption, visit http://www.labrescuefl.org/ and review the How to Adopt section. If you have any questions, please write info@lrrof.org. All potential adopters will have an interview, home inspection and, where applicable, vet reference before they are eligible to adopt. Thank you for your interest in our rescue.

Animal cruelty on video sites

I got an email about people who are concerned with seeing animal cruelty videos on sites like Utube.
Specifically the writer said, "I don't think most people are aware of this. Specifically, the advice to not view the videos and immediately report it to this joint FBI task force."
She sent along a link from American Humane to read. I do think this is worthy of mentioning so please view the link and if you ever see anything like this, follow the instructions on the link.
If we don't speak out, who will?

Flyball Event in Sarasota next April

Super fun event to keep your eye open for in Sarasota next April.
It's flyball.
I will post more information as it become available to me, but keep in mind any dog can be a flyball champ.
If you would like more information on the sport, check out the Barkaholics team from Sarasota.

Fun place to go on Sunday

Responsible Dog Owner's Day is 10/17, from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at SOTC. There will be obedience, rally, agility, flyball, Earth Dog, Gun Dog, and tracking Demos and CGC Testing.
Sounds like a fun event.
Click here for directions.

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Labrador available for adoption



My name is Daisy, a beautiful, peaceful 5 year old black female. No high maintenance here. My shiny black Labrador coat and warm brown eyes are irrestible whether I am relaxing at your side or being your best buddy as we walk.
I have an out of shape left rear leg from an old injury but that does not keep me down. I get along really well with other dogs and love people. The best home situation for me would be one without cats or other small animals, though.
I was found tied up to a bench outside of a Humane Society and am very grateful to be in a foster home. I can really use my nose to get your attention and do so from time to time! After all, who doesn't want pats and hugs and ear rubs?
Labrador Retriever Rescue of Florida is a state-wide, foster home based, all volunteer rescue group. To inquire about the Labs available for adoption, visit http://www.labrescuefl.org/ and review the How to Adopt section. If you have any questions, please write info@lrrof.org. All potential adopters will have an interview, home inspection and, where applicable, vet reference before they are eligible to adopt. Thank you for your interest in our rescue.

The value of seniors

Senior animals play such an important role in what I do so every chance I get, I must reiterate the value of these animals. I have adopted several and my dog now was 7 when he came to live at my house.
There are many people who believe a companion animal loses their worth after they have become middle-aged, but the following story, although sad, will show just what joy they can bring, especially to a senior citizen.
When my mother lost her Australian Shepherd, Lady almost 5 years ago, I thought her heart would never mend. She adopted Lady from Bishop Animal Shelter in Bradenton shortly after my father passed away and how on earth she controlled that 9 month old pup I have no idea. Lady lived for almost 16 years and Mom was devastated when she died.
I tried for over a year to get her to adopt another dog but she was simply not ready.
One Saturday I went in for my volunteer stint at the HSSC, when the kennel manager, Karen called me in the back to tell me she had found the perfect dog for my Mom. I went back and saw this long haired, foxy looking dog who was listed as a beagle mix in a kennel. She was 13 years old and her name was Jordan. She was small and I thought my Mom would like her. I told Karen I did not believe my Mom was ready for another dog but I would call her and ask.
She surprised me by saying, "Great!" Come get me and I will meet her. Well, my Mom lives in Lakeland, so off I went, picked her up, came back to the HSSC and it was love at first sight.
Jordan lived with my mom and was her constant companion for 3.5 years. When hospice was called in to care for Mom, she always said she would be okay because she had Jordan there to keep her company.
Jordan died two weeks ago from old age. She was almost 17 and my mother is all alone again. This little senior dog, 13 at adoption, brought 3 and a half years of joy to my Mom which she would not have had without her.
My Mom is still under hospice care but all alone now. The question becomes if she is able to care for another senior and who will be responsible for that animal should Mom go first. It has been tossed back and forth between my brother and I and we are of the same mind that Mom cannot care for another pet due to her health. How sad is it when I say this because I believe Jordan's companionship helped prolong my mother's good health.
Please do not abandon senior pets. They can bring so much joy to a family or perhaps a senior citizen.

Welcome back LRRoF

With the blog hiatus being over, I am please to have Labrador Retriever Rescue of Florida back in the swing of things with more dogs who need homes.
Hi everybody, Frankie is my name. I am one handsome boy as you can see! I was so happy when the shelter called LRROF and they placed me with a foster family who shows me lots of love and attention.
I knew my life was about to change for the better. My foster Mama says I am such a good boy and she loves my gentle kisses. I am about 2 yrs. old, 70 pounds; just a happy, go-lucky boy! Mind you, I was found with a garden hose tied around my neck, so when I say I walk on my leash pretty well, it is a good thing. Sometimes I get a little rambunctious so I am best suited for a home without small children, small dogs and cats. But I can be calm, too. Take for example those treats--YUMMY!! I take them energetically, but gently.
If you think Frankie would be the perfect fit for your family, check this out.
Labrador Retriever Rescue of Florida is a state-wide, foster home based, all volunteer rescue group. To inquire about the Labs available for adoption, visit http://www.labrescuefl.org/ and review the How to Adopt section. If you have any questions, please write info@lrrof.org. All potential adopters will have an interview, home inspection and, where applicable, vet reference before they are eligible to adopt. Thank you for your interest in our rescue.

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

When a purebred just won't do

I have a love affair with mutts. You know what I am talking about. Those sad-eyed, mixed breed dogs which seem be born with bad luck.
I have owned several. I believe they are grateful. They seem to have a sense about them which my Rottweilers never had.
They have all been relatively healthy. No problems like hip displaysia or anything like that. I compare it to mixing up the DNA so it is healthier than the overbred dogs many people own today.
Buzz is a mutt. You couldn't ask for a better dog. He lived outside his whole life and was in pretty poor condition when we first met, but since coming to my house he has never had an accident inside. Doesn't chew anything but toys. Doesn't beg for table food although I think he would if I encouraged it. Chases all the wild critters from the yard but doesn't catch anything. He takes his thyroid pill with relative ease, eats what I put down for him with no complaints and even lets me cut his toenails with very little hassle. Who could want anything more?
So, when you reach a point where a purebred just won't do, please visit your local rescue or shelter and find yourself a mutt. Breeding does show.

Where there is smoke

I am against pet stores which sell live animals. For anyone who wants to continue to wear blinders about what happens in these establishments, I offer yet another story which shows the normal conditions in most pet shops.
Most people who speak for these businesses, believe we in the animal rescue world are against purebred dogs. This is not true for me, or for most of the people I speak to. We are against puppy mills, which are the places where pet shops purchase most of the merchandise they sell. Notice I called these poor animals merchandise. This is because that is what they are considered. A way to make money. Period. No ifs, ands or buts about it.
I have said it before and will again: If you want a pedigreed dog, find a breeder who is listed with the AKC and make sure you visit them and check out their facilities. There are reputable breeders who provide this service when you simply must have those papers. There are also many, too many to count, homeless purebreds who wait in shelters and rescues for someone to give them a home.
Keep the heat on these pet stores. If you see disgusting conditions, call your local authorities. They will pay attention.

Let's keep shooting dogs, why don't we?

The headline on this piece was meant as a sarcastic, tongue in cheek headline. The reason behind the sarcasm is the number of dogs which have been shot and killed in the last month or so by police officers who were in "fear for their lives." Huh? http://www.floridatoday.com/article/20101012/BREAKINGNEWS/101012007/1086/Deputy+forced+to+shoot++kill+charging+pit+bull+in+Port+St.+John
http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-deputy-attacked-dog-killed-20100915,0,258663.story
The last I knew about, police officers carried pepper spray, tasers, batons and numerous other pieces of equipment to curtail an attacking dog. We used to use a spray of water from the hose, but anything which will divert their attention of what they are aiming for tends to work.
I guess these officers simply found it easier to shoot the dog dead, instead of trying another method of diversion. Or maybe they are simply wimpy, scaredy cat officers who have never been around dogs.
There was one though, near Ocala, which they tasered. Of course, he was a Great Dane, not a Pit Bull so that probably made the difference. http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-astor-drug-seizures-marijuana-20101005,0,7046734.story
Biased? You're right, I am. I am sorry for the dogs who continue to be denigrated in the media so people really do begin to believe all the horror stories. The question in my mind is: if they are so quick to shoot a dog because they are in fear for their life, what happens when they must make a snap decision with a human?

Mojo is returning, slowly but surely

Okay, my self-imposed break from the blog is coming to an end. I cannot promise daily updates on things, but am finding there is much to talk about or voice an opinion on in the daily news. Keeping my mouth from voicing my opinion has always been hard and with all the news lately, it has become even more so.
So stay tuned. The best is yet to come.